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The Vibrant History of Confetti
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The Vibrant History of Confetti

With our Spring Collection launching in just a few weeks with ALL NEW CONFETTI, we thought it might be fun to share a little history of confetti and where the heck it came from after all...you might be surprised! 

If you can believe it, the concept of confetti has long been a part of this world, dating back to the Greeks. No, not the Sigma-Delta-whatever kind of Greeks from your college days or our Confetti Greek Letters; we're talking the real Greeks, Party Girl. The origins of confetti date back to the ancient Greeks, who had a custom called “phyllobia” where they threw branches, leaves, garlands, and other plants when soldiers returned home, an athlete won a game, or two people tied the knot. 

 Our fave word “confetti” stems from the Latin word “conficere,” which means “to prepare or make ready.” But as we learned wayyy back in high school, the romance languages borrowed from Latin too. So the French adapted the word to mean preserving, like “confiture” (jam) and “confit” (preserved meat). Then in the 18th century, the Italians began using the word “confetti” to mean “little sweets” (one of our other fave words!).

Believe it or not, the earliest confetti most likely was candy and sweets! Can you imagine being showered with candy at parties now?! Talk about a DREAM scenario! In the 19th century at Carnevale in Italy, people would toss sugarplums to celebrate. But it quickly took a dark turn - since sugar was expensive in those days, people often replaced the candy with stones, bones, and plaster balls. OUCH! 

Luckily, things changed in 1875 thanks to silkworms (no, seriously - stick with us here!). We know it’s gross to think about, but silkworks can have a hard time hatching out of their eggs. Textile merchants realized that putting pieces of perforated paper above the trays of eggs would catch on to the sticky shells and help the silkworms pull their way through. One Italian mill owner realized that he could cut up this paper and hand it out to his employees during Carnevale - he figured, if they’re going to throw something during the festival, might as well be something that won’t hurt anybody! And voilà, the concept of the paper confetti we all know and love was born! 

From weddings to the New Year’s Eve ball drop, confetti has become a true celebration essential. But of course confetti isn't just for throwing anymore; we love using confetti to make every day a celebration with any of our confetti backpacks, confetti totes, confetti pouches, and more

What’s your favorite way to celebrate with confetti? Drop us a note in the comments below! 

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